research highlights positive impact of invasive plant species on coastal wetlands - carbon dioxide absorbent

by:Demi     2019-09-07
research highlights positive impact of invasive plant species on coastal wetlands  -  carbon dioxide absorbent
They are considered harmful to our environment, but new studies have found that certain invasive plant species can actually improve the ability of coastal wetlands to absorb carbon dioxide.
But scientists at the University of Cork also found
Local animals almost always have a negative impact on the ability of these regions to capture carbon dioxide.
This is because they erode the soil and consume local vegetation, which stores carbon.
Important CO2-consuming plants are being threatened as the coastal wetlands they grow are disappearing due to changes in land use.
According to the study, as many as 50% of the world's coastal wetlands were destroyed in the last century and are currently losing square kilometers per year.
The disappearance of the land will not only lead to the loss of plants, but also lead to the release of carbon dioxide previously stored by vegetation.
I thought before
Local species are generally detrimental to threatened areas, but this study led to Dr. Grace Cott from the UCC School of Biology, Earth and Environmental Sciences and the Institute of Environment, which is not the case.
It also raises the question of how best to manage coastal ecosystems in order to allow native species to continue to store carbon, perhaps with the help of beneficial "intruders, but at the same time control the harmful effects of invasive animals.
The study, conducted in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution, was published in the journal Global Change Biology.
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